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Self-care– lifestyle

5 Practical Tips On Maintaining A Consistent Meditation Practise

We have written many blogs on meditation and the benefits. It changed my life, I went from being a stressed out, reactive person who exploded when things went wrong to a (relatively) calm person who is more or less in control of their actions.

The three main actions I put in place to help me were:

  • Meditation
  • Fresh air
  • Exercise

You can read more about my anger management issues and how I dealt with it here.

If you don’t currently meditate I recommend you try it. Hopefully, you’ll find the following tips useful. They’re also great if you struggle to keep your meditation practise consistently. Consistency is the key to meditation. There is more value in meditating every day for five minutes than in meditating once or twice a week for twenty minutes.

1. Create a comfortable space

The space you practise in is important. You won’t be able to settle into a relaxed state or let go of what’s going on around you if there are distractions, whether it’s noise or discomfort it will be on your mind. Background noise is sometimes ok, for example, if you’re meditating outside and there are distant voices or traffic but a close-up conversation or loud distracting noise will throw you off.

If I’m travelling or for whatever reason, I can’t meditate at home I have a pair of noise-cancelling headphones and a blindfold. Theresa constantly makes fun of me when I use these, especially if I happen to be wearing my poncho at the same time but that is the way it goes I suppose.

I use a meditation cushion because I can’t sit on the floor without some support. I also like to sit on the floor because if I sit in a chair I tend to fall asleep as I meditate early in the morning.

2. Meditate at the same time in the same place every day

Just as consistently meditating every day is important it also helps to meditate in the same place at the same time every day.

I meditate in the morning for two reasons. I need to get up before the baby (little babies don’t seem to agree that we should sit still in silence), also it sets me up for the day ahead, especially if I have a stressful day in work ahead of me.

Being consistent with the time and place also makes it easier to form a habit. You will hear different opinions on this but it generally takes about 40 days or so to form a habit and come to a point where you will do something without really thinking about it, like brushing your teeth or making breakfast.

Make it part of your morning routine.

3. Start Small

I meditate for 20 minutes every day and have been doing this consistently for about four years. I have certainly missed practises or not gotten my full twenty minutes in over the years but generally, I have been hitting the 20-minute mark every day.

I don’t recommend starting out at 20 minutes, that’s likely to lead to an inconsistent practice. Start small – 5 minutes a day or even 2 minutes a day. Try to keep it up for a month.

You won’t feel massive benefits from 1 or 2 minutes a day but you will feel some difference. Notice that difference and once you have a consistent short practise that’s where you can build up gradually to 10 or 20 minutes a day.

20 minutes is what works for me, I tried half an hour for a while but it was a little much for me at the start of the day from a practical perspective.

4. Use an App to help

I understand that meditation is about getting away from screens and input from everyday life but there are apps available that are very helpful.

I like to use an app because I can see how consistent I am and it’s useful for the timer. I keep my phone in flight mode with the screen black and white and light dimmed so I’m not interacting with it or receiving notifications which will distract me.

It is very important to keep the notifications, emails, texts etc out of your day until after meditation. Also, keep a buffer period between the meditation and screen time. My phone is set up so most of my apps are unavailable until after 7 am. I’m already out of the house at that time. If you’re curious about recommendations to limit screentime you can find them here.

I use Insight Timer. It’s free and it also has thousands of guided meditation available but you can also try Headspace. There are many others out there also that I have not tried.

One little thing I’d like to mention – many apps keep track of how many consecutive days you have achieved. Try and stay away from the competitive mentality of getting a tally of many days in a row. Consistency is the key but it’s not about being “good” at it or hitting 100 consecutive days.

5. If you don’t feel like meditating cut it shorter

If I am in a hurry in the mornings or got up too late or just don’t feel like meditating for whatever reason, I will try to do 10 minutes instead, or even 5 and then sometimes when I reach the 5-minute mark I may be in a state of mind where I continue.

If I miss completely I try to get it in the evening before bed even if it’s just 5 minutes.

Remember, It’s ok to miss a day, just try not to miss two or three days in a row or you will start to form a new habit of inconsistent meditation.

 

I hope this helps. Working towards the 20-minute mark is a good place to be for consistent meditation. Many people recommend 30 minutes or an hour or I have friends who get great benefits from 20 minutes twice a day but that is not always practical.

Do what works for you and notice how you feel after.

Peace,

George

 

Useful links:

My current yoga/meditation routine – How it has changed since baby

Meditation challenge – 40-day sadhana – Habits define you

A daily meditation practice – Make it work for you

Meditation – It takes two minutes

 

Humility Can Be The Path To A Meaningful Life

As a yoga teacher, humility is one of my core values, indeed it is a value that can guide us through life.

A lack of humility can lead to a wanting and yearning for more, more money, more power, more style, more cars, more food. This craving comes from our survival instinct, the desire for self preservation and the need to protect and provide for those we love. There does however, come a time when we have enough and any yearning is for more than we need (see here for recent gratitude blog on having enough).

It is ok to want more, to want to be comfortable and to indulge ourselves, I am not speaking of abstinence or a life of stoicism but we must understand why we want something. Is it for the right reasons? Are we seeking treasures to adorn ourselves with from a standpoint of competitive behaviour, to take someone else down a level?

This is where we need to check ourselves and get in touch with humility.

“Work for a cause, not for applause.”

Think on the violent history of our race, the most recent wars in history. Where did they stem from? Did Hitler invade Europe for the betterment of his people? Yes, but from a self serving point of view.

Compare leaders of the world and famous figures – Donald Trump, Barack Obama, Mahatma Ghandi, Conor McGregor. What are their qualities and how do they serve themselves, and in turn serve the world? Do you see humility in them?

Who do you root for? The underdog or the one who talks himself up all the time?

A lack of humility leads to violence. Take the caste system in India, the civil rights movement in the US, slavery, the expansion of the British Empire. All of the above has lead to strife, pain and hardship in the name of one group being perceived as being better than the other. Perception is the key word here and that is where humility comes into play. The most humble of us will not, by definition, think herself greater than others nor will she strive to be greater.

“Never look down on somebody unless you’re helping him up.”

Putting ourselves first is important, indeed I have written about it before (link here) but when we put ourselves first and surpass others by wanting what is beyond our needs, that is where the ego and greed come into play. Humility can teach us the value of both having enough and being enough. There is plenty to go around, we do not need all of the accessories to place ourselves above others in the pecking order.

That does not mean a humble person will not strive for greatness, do not mistake humility for a lack of ambition. It means that the humble person will not look down on others, will not seek to oppress others and will not seek to take from others for their own betterment.

Nor am I saying that competition is not good. It is part of our nature and without it we would roll over and die, never defending ourselves and never standing up for what is right. We can keep our competitive streak and remain humble, the two are not exclusive.

Humility can cure the wanting and craving in our hearts and in turn quash the over indulgence that is suffocating our planet and tame the aggressive nature of the beast that resides within us as we mature as a race.

Let us look inside our selves and search for that humility. Can we give everybody a chance and not judge. Question our motives. Why do we want something, is it for the right reasons? When we strive to better ourselves, is it at the expense of others and to what end? Do we push to get ahead or to contribute to a greater good? What path are we on?

If we stop and think and really consider our motives and our state of mind we can start looking at things from a more humble perspective.

“Be like the bamboo, the higher you grow, the deeper you bow.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screentime – Remember To Take A Break

I took a class in a beautiful yoga studio last week. The room was open and spacious, the decor was calming and the mood content.

The teacher brought us through a relaxing sequence which was ideal after a days work to quiet the mind and come down from the stress and stimulus of modern living.

At the end of the class, after we closed and we started to move again I noticed two people immediately had phones in their hands before they even left the mat. They sat with their shoulders hunched and their eyes close to the screen as if they would be sucked inside of it.

There was no worry or consternation on their faces after to suggest that there were circumstances which required both of them to check their phones immediately after class.

This was disheartening for me to see. There is so much more to yoga than just the exercise. Meditation and looking inwards are an equally important part of yoga just as much as the postures.

How can we look inward to ourselves if we cannot resist the urge to go to our screens immediately after our yoga session.

I wonder how the teacher who offered the beautiful class felt when she saw two of the recipients immediately pick up their phones and hunch over them like Golem with the ring.

There are mental benefits to be taken from yoga and meditation, which are lost if we do not allow them to sink in.

I too am guilty of too much screen time. I am writing this blog on a device as I speak. My screen-time app on my IPhone tells me that I spent an average of 2 hours a day on my phone in the last 7 days.

Surely though there is a time and a place.

All to often I see people stare into a screen with their thumbs moving furiously while out for dinner with a group or in a meeting. It is a well known fact that we cannot multi task, we simply jump from one task to another and loose efficiency as we do so. If we are focused on the screen we are not focused on anything else.

There are certain spaces which have no place for screens, those places we come to relax and unwind. Your bedroom for example. The yoga studio. The church or the temple.

My fear is that as a society we will become entranced as a whole, unable to detach and therefore unable to destress. We will become blind to what is around us because we see everything through a 7 inch screen.

My hope is that as a society we will see these screens for what they are. Useful tools, but nothing more than interactive two dimensional surfaces which cannot replace real experiences.

My hope is that we take the time to let our minds digest the experiences laid out before us before we get sucked back into the black hole of a screen.

A black hole is so powerful that even light cannot escape, an IPhone screen is so powerful that it takes our thoughts, ideas and feelings.

Here are some simple tips we can put in place to limit or become more aware of our screen time:

  1. Leave the phone at home a little more. Recognize that it is not always required.
  2. Leave it in another room while you sleep.
  3. Use screentime – you’ll find it in settings for IPhone. Im not sure about android.
  4. Take a break from social media. See if you miss it.

I hope this helps.

Peace,

George

How I Overcame My Anger Issues

When I was a small boy I was always considered to be a little bit irritable. I was particular and meticulous and very detailed orientated. Maybe this played a part in the tendency toward annoyance or lack of tolerance towards things not working out.

As I grew older I was more interested in books and small toys than soccer or being outside. It’s funny now, though I still love to read and I still love toys I live for the outdoors. The outdoors changed me.

I’m not sure when my bad temper developed, maybe it was always there but it grew more intense. I was never unhappy child, nothing in my life contributed towards it, I think that some people need to work on their reactions more than others.

I have never been in a fist fight in my entire life, I am not a violent man but there is a destructive nature inside me. As I write this I try to remember when I first noticed it or when it first became a problem. The earliest I can remember breaking something through anger was probably when I was in my twenties.

I am sure that an immature disrespect for other peoples property played a part also but it followed through my twenties and into my mid thirties until I finally realized I had to do something about it.

The anger I felt never interfered with my life or my relationships but I know now through research the effect that intense anger has on both the body and the brain.

The emotions I felt were not simply anger or irritation but rage. A rage which would build up to an uncontrollable level where I could not hold my reaction. It was blind and uncontrollable, like a drug in my veins.

It took a long trail of little broken items before I realized it was effecting my mental health through the stress it laid on me.

It is difficult to describe the hold the rage took on me. From my perspective I went from zero to ten (on an anger scale) immediately with no warning. In all reality it was building and I was too distracted to see it. The pressure built until it could no longer be contained and I reacted physically by breaking something.

There is a misled idea out there that it is macho to lose ones temper and that someone who smashes things is someone you don’t mess with. If you met me you would realize this is not the case but on a serious note, we cannot associate losing control with strength. It is a weakness, in fact it is probably one of the weakest acts one can commit.

In my angry outbursts I put my fist through several windows, doors, laptop screens, smart phones, I once cracked a car windshield. I mention these because I want to be honest. It will seem funny to some people and pathetic to others but the simple fact is that losing control is and act of weakness brought on by lack of awareness and mismanagement of my emotions.

It wasn’t just the outburst or having to buy a new phone or laptop screen or door or whatever it happened to be this time, it was the low I would feel afterwards. What comes up must come down. The low was every bit as extreme as the high of the intense rage. A great sadness that would swallow me up.

It was maybe four or five years ago when I went to see a professional about my anger issues. It wasn’t a particularly difficult step for me and to be honest I don’t think I took it seriously, but never the less I went through my own choice without suggestion or coercion.

The funny thing is that, for me the answer was so much simpler. The professional I spoke to encouraged me to make the visits a part of my ongoing lifestyle but I did not keep it up.

I believe every situation is unique and I am writing about my own experience only. My opinions on my own therapy sessions do not bear any weight on the experience in general or the importance of seeking help.

In my own particular case I eventually realized that the solution was there all along, within my grasp, ready for me to take hold of. I just couldn’t see it.

I do not remember exactly where and when I put the following practises in place, I believe it was a gradual process but the simple practises I will talk about changed my mindset and in doing so changed my life.

Journalling and reflection:

For some years I have been keeping a diary, inspired by my father I think who religiously writes about his day in his spidery writing, documenting his days.

I like to document my day and read back through it sometimes, but it is also important to offload everything onto paper, your thoughts, your dreams, your worries, your feelings.

Now, I understand again the macho attitude that writing in journals is not how a man deals with things. This is the bullshit attitute we need to make a thing of the past. Times are changing and, we as a race are waking up to what we need.

If I did not incorporate these measures I would be out of shape, stressed out, unhappy and unhealthy.

Exercise:

Movement is so important. I sit at a desk for most of the day, but even if you have a reasonably active job the important thing here is to get the heart rate up.

Vigorous exercise produces brain chemicals which are proven to make us happier.

Cut out negative people:

Life is too short to deal with negative attitudes. Negative talk effects our brains. How can you remain positive if you are not receiving positive vibes and energy.

This sounds callous, but to be honest, so what? We are not users who hang around with people just to gain something, but conversely, we do not have to tolerate people in our lives who offer nothing positive and negatively effect us.

Get away from a negative environment:

My work environment was stressful. It was only in hindsight that I realized I did not enjoy my job and that it was chipping away at me bit by bit every day. It is hard to make a change when you do not realize the change needs to be made, but deep down I knew and eventually it surfaced, and I became receptive to moving on.

It was when I opened up to the possibility that the opportunity presented itself.

Gratitude:

I listened to a TedTALK where a Fransiscan monk spoke about the merits of gratitude and that it is the path to hapiness.

This may seem unrealistic. If you think so just try it out for a week. Write down three things you are grateful for everyday and see how it feels.

Smile:

Again, this may seem like it can’t make a real overall difference but it does. Smile, even if you don’t feel like it, just fake it. The happy chemicals will come flooding straight in like a whole bunch of happy drugs.

Have a read of my blog on the effects of smiling.

Eat healthy:

You are what you eat. Garbage in, garbage out. Be smart with your food choices. I ate crap for about 28 years of my life, actually it was when Theresa and I moved in together that my diet changed. I wonder why?

Yoga:

Yoga saved me. It was through yoga that I found so many other practises like meditation and really looking inwards to see myself. It also brings so much focus to the breath which I think is the most important aspect of our lives.

Fresh air:

There is no better medicine than clean fresh air. I have not been sick in years, but I remember heading up into the fresh winter air of the north shore mountains in Vancouver and feeling all the symptoms immediately disappear once I got out into the crisp clean air.

It has the same effect on the mind, cleaning out any crap which is clogged up in there, whether it be thoughts, emotions or just general junk.

Be positive:

Negative self talk will literally kill you, eventually. You cannot change your self talk until you start to listen to it and for that you need space and silence which brings me onto my next topic.

Meditation:

In my opinion everybody needs to meditate. It should be thought in schools and encouraged in the work place. My daughter will be brought up with meditation being part of her life like brushing her teeth or washing her hands, a part of daily life.

I cannot stress the importance meditation enough. A friend of mine once told me he wasn’t a meditation kind of guy. I had suggested it when he spoke about his many stresses. It seemed better to remain stressed out rather than do something about it.

If the body is tired or stressed we rest it. The mind is no different. We need to create space and silence in the mind so that we can see ourselves and observe our state.

I could never change my course of action when I was to wound up because I couldn’t even see the issue. I just spiralled out of control

Breath:

The breath controls everyhing. Without the breath we cannot live, we cannot move. The breath creates space both in the body and mind. It also gives us the chance to pause.

How many times have you been told to take a deep breath?

It works. Take a slow, deep breath and you take the time to pause, take stock of the situation and come away from the shallow, quick (fight or flight) breathing to a more controlled state of mind.

If one deep breath has this effect, imagine what you can do with ten deep breaths.

I have given a lot of information here, to simplify it, if I were to pick the top three things that helped me overcome my anger issues I would say:

  1. Exercise (yoga and hiking)
  2. Fresh air
  3. Meditation

So after all that, where am I now? It is about four years since I have started to take yoga and meditation seriously.

Maybe I lie in the title when I say I overcame my anger issues. The anger surfaces from time to time, though far less often than it used to. It probably always will, but the difference is that now I can see where I am at.

I am aware of what is happening and I am aware of what I can do to take myself out of the situation or deal with it in a calm manner.

I think I am healthier (physically and mentally) now than I ever have been in my entire life.

It takes effort, it is something I will work on for the rest of my life but the only effort is in being consistent, it is in remembering to be kind to yourself and in knowing that you will slip up sometimes but that there is a way to calm the rough seas and let everything become still.

There is a way to slow down and stop you just have to give yourself the space to see that.

Peace,

George

PS, if you like the blog PLEASE share it on the social.

Morning Routine: Creating A Routine That’s Makes You Get Out of Bed……..(Most of the Time)

Monday to Friday mornings are scheduled to fit in a routine which makes us feel energized and awake before work. Each morning George & I have about 2 free hours before leaving for work. We have scheduled our mornings to include activities which make our mornings more pleasant. We rise between 4:45am-5:00am, we need incentives to roll out of bed that early!

The first thing I do when I get up is go into the kitchen and put on the kettle to boil. A short walk to the bathroom to complete each step of my face cleaning and moisturizing routine. Once my face feels fresh and clean I grab my body brush, apply some coconut oil to the bristles and massage in skin in circular motions. Once this little ritual is complete I am fully awake.

After my self-care routine I brew a mug of earl grey tea or Irish breakfast tea. Then I prepare our lunches and snacks for work. This takes about 20min and I like doing this in the morning, so our lunch is fresh, and I find it a lovely way to ease into the morning.

Once lunch is complete, I move onto breakfast. We eat the same thing Monday to Friday. Almond yogurt, ½ teaspoon of turmeric & cinnamon, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, goji berries, flax, granola and blueberries/raspberries or strawberries on top. A large pot of our favorite green tea is brewed and that’s it. Breakfast in total takes about 15min to prepare.

During all the above George completes his morning yoga self-practice routine.

In the summer we eat outside on our rooftop. We place all our breakfast essentials on our tray and walk outside to set up breakfast to watch the sunrise.

For me what helps me get up early these days is the sunrise. I love being outside in the morning before most people wake up. The silence and the stillness are very comforting.

We notice the birds more this hour of the morning. We have a beautiful tree very close to us which several hummingbirds always visit early in the morning. We love hummingbirds. Soo cute, so tiny and super-fast. The other morning one came close to George and was just hovering by his ear! So funny😉

Breakfast takes us about 20min to eat. Once done we bring everything inside. George does the dishes, cleans down the counters and makes the bed.

I like to practice 15min of yoga with 10min meditation after. I do a series of stretches that help wake my body up and roll out any tightness that has formed throughout the night.

Once my yoga is complete I brush my teeth and get dressed for work. Then I spend about 20min applying my make-up and styling my hair. Very simple routine which makes me feel glowing and fresh.

The morning routine can change slightly from time to time, sometimes I have time to read for 10min or I listen to my audio book while getting ready. Generally, however I like as much silence in the morning as possible. We were never people to have a radio or TV on in the background. We need quiet time to ease into our day.

For now this is our morning routine Monday to Friday, maybe it may change but currently we are happy with it. We feel awake and ready for the day after it.

Saturday and Sunday are totally open to how we are feeling. However, we have started a tradition that George makes me breakfast Sunday morning while I read in bed. Love Sunday mornings so much. I realize I need to take these moments to relax and recharge. I love taking time to care for myself and Sunday mornings are my favorite time to do this.

We would love to hear if you have a favorite morning routine.

What do you do to wake up in the morning?

What is the ultimate Sunday morning for you?

Once again thanks for reading, I hope this is helpful if you are planning on getting up a little earlier in the mornings.

Have a great week.

Chat soon,

Theresa x