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2020 Challenge: Buying Less & Appreciating What We Already Have

Our transition to living a more mindful lifestyle has been a huge eye-opening experience. The amount of needless waste we created in the past is shocking to us now. Personally, I was a compulsive shopper, who would shop to help improve a dull mood. No thought was put into what was bought or questions were never asked like, “Do I need this?”, “Have I something similar?”, “Will I wear this next year?”.

Shopping was something I did when I was bored, sad, happy, excited, basically, I needed no excuse. My perception of happiness & the first thought of contentment entered my mind after we moved to Canada. We began working & socializing with people who had “everything”: the cars, the houses, the clothes, the shoes, the jewellery, the bags, the holidays & the money.

However, these people still felt they did not have enough. After a shopping spree of which I spent A LOT of money, I came home and began looking online at other things I could purchase……for some reason I caught myself doing this & paused. I paused to think about the people who we got to know in recent years, so much money but it wasn’t enough, more money had to be earned, more holidays, more houses, more bags, shoes etc. had to be got. That’s when I realised it would never end for me, I would constantly come home after shopping and feel I needed more. I wanted to feel content with what I had and start to live my life differently.

The first thing that I wanted to change was my wardrobe. I wanted a wardrobe that would last years & not date. I started researching about capsule wardrobes and how French girls always look chic & stylish with only a handful of garments. This was the first step on the road to a new life for us.

Almost 5 years later, we both have capsule wardrobes and are so much more content in our lives. With contentment comes happiness. We appreciate what we have & take care of our things so they can last as long as possible. We are conscious of our waste and look for ways to reduce our carbon footprint. In light of all the climate protests in 2019, we have decided to challenge ourselves to reduce our waste further in 2020.

One way we plan on doing this is through the challenge #2020wehaveplenty which was created by Signe from Uselesswardrobe.dk. It is a small set of rules for reducing our buying for 2020. Buying only what we need, trying to source it second hand first are our priorities.

If you are interested in joining the challenge please take a look at the buy less 2020 recommendations list below and post your pictures in Instagram to the hashtag #2020wehaveplenty.

So far, we have been loving this challenge. Today I bought a dress for my friend’s wedding in June in a second-hand store for a fraction of the original price. I had seen the dress in a high-end store last year and couldn’t justify paying the amount for the dress. I was so happy to have found the dress and now I have a beautiful dress for any other fancy occasions for years to come. This has been my only purchase this year, and it was on my list of items to get. Super happy.

The best of luck on your low spending in 2020.

Chat soon,

Theresa xxx

 

5 Practical Tips On Maintaining A Consistent Meditation Practise

We have written many blogs on meditation and the benefits. It changed my life, I went from being a stressed out, reactive person who exploded when things went wrong to a (relatively) calm person who is more or less in control of their actions.

The three main actions I put in place to help me were:

  • Meditation
  • Fresh air
  • Exercise

You can read more about my anger management issues and how I dealt with it here.

If you don’t currently meditate I recommend you try it. Hopefully, you’ll find the following tips useful. They’re also great if you struggle to keep your meditation practise consistently. Consistency is the key to meditation. There is more value in meditating every day for five minutes than in meditating once or twice a week for twenty minutes.

1. Create a comfortable space

The space you practise in is important. You won’t be able to settle into a relaxed state or let go of what’s going on around you if there are distractions, whether it’s noise or discomfort it will be on your mind. Background noise is sometimes ok, for example, if you’re meditating outside and there are distant voices or traffic but a close-up conversation or loud distracting noise will throw you off.

If I’m travelling or for whatever reason, I can’t meditate at home I have a pair of noise-cancelling headphones and a blindfold. Theresa constantly makes fun of me when I use these, especially if I happen to be wearing my poncho at the same time but that is the way it goes I suppose.

I use a meditation cushion because I can’t sit on the floor without some support. I also like to sit on the floor because if I sit in a chair I tend to fall asleep as I meditate early in the morning.

2. Meditate at the same time in the same place every day

Just as consistently meditating every day is important it also helps to meditate in the same place at the same time every day.

I meditate in the morning for two reasons. I need to get up before the baby (little babies don’t seem to agree that we should sit still in silence), also it sets me up for the day ahead, especially if I have a stressful day in work ahead of me.

Being consistent with the time and place also makes it easier to form a habit. You will hear different opinions on this but it generally takes about 40 days or so to form a habit and come to a point where you will do something without really thinking about it, like brushing your teeth or making breakfast.

Make it part of your morning routine.

3. Start Small

I meditate for 20 minutes every day and have been doing this consistently for about four years. I have certainly missed practises or not gotten my full twenty minutes in over the years but generally, I have been hitting the 20-minute mark every day.

I don’t recommend starting out at 20 minutes, that’s likely to lead to an inconsistent practice. Start small – 5 minutes a day or even 2 minutes a day. Try to keep it up for a month.

You won’t feel massive benefits from 1 or 2 minutes a day but you will feel some difference. Notice that difference and once you have a consistent short practise that’s where you can build up gradually to 10 or 20 minutes a day.

20 minutes is what works for me, I tried half an hour for a while but it was a little much for me at the start of the day from a practical perspective.

4. Use an App to help

I understand that meditation is about getting away from screens and input from everyday life but there are apps available that are very helpful.

I like to use an app because I can see how consistent I am and it’s useful for the timer. I keep my phone in flight mode with the screen black and white and light dimmed so I’m not interacting with it or receiving notifications which will distract me.

It is very important to keep the notifications, emails, texts etc out of your day until after meditation. Also, keep a buffer period between the meditation and screen time. My phone is set up so most of my apps are unavailable until after 7 am. I’m already out of the house at that time. If you’re curious about recommendations to limit screentime you can find them here.

I use Insight Timer. It’s free and it also has thousands of guided meditation available but you can also try Headspace. There are many others out there also that I have not tried.

One little thing I’d like to mention – many apps keep track of how many consecutive days you have achieved. Try and stay away from the competitive mentality of getting a tally of many days in a row. Consistency is the key but it’s not about being “good” at it or hitting 100 consecutive days.

5. If you don’t feel like meditating cut it shorter

If I am in a hurry in the mornings or got up too late or just don’t feel like meditating for whatever reason, I will try to do 10 minutes instead, or even 5 and then sometimes when I reach the 5-minute mark I may be in a state of mind where I continue.

If I miss completely I try to get it in the evening before bed even if it’s just 5 minutes.

Remember, It’s ok to miss a day, just try not to miss two or three days in a row or you will start to form a new habit of inconsistent meditation.

 

I hope this helps. Working towards the 20-minute mark is a good place to be for consistent meditation. Many people recommend 30 minutes or an hour or I have friends who get great benefits from 20 minutes twice a day but that is not always practical.

Do what works for you and notice how you feel after.

Peace,

George

 

Useful links:

My current yoga/meditation routine – How it has changed since baby

Meditation challenge – 40-day sadhana – Habits define you

A daily meditation practice – Make it work for you

Meditation – It takes two minutes

 

Belief Allows Us To Achieve Everything

We often set our sights on a task, something that we want to achieve in life, for example, to take yoga teacher training and teach regular classes. This was certainly not an insurmountable goal but it was not possible without believing it could be done. I am a civil engineer. What business does a civil engineer working in the construction industry have in teaching yoga? That was my thought process but that had to change. I had to believe I would teach yoga.

External circumstances do not dictate the ultimate direction of our lives. We have the power to go where we want to go. We have the power to steer our lives in the direction we want to steer it, we just have to realize that. We can achieve whatever we want to achieve, once we believe it.

Ask yourself. What do you know to be true about yourself? What are your limitations? What holds you back?

Now go back to those questions again. What holds you back? Nothing. There are no limitations. What are you reaching for? If it’s out of reach and you can’t grasp it, then build a ladder.

In other words, do the work.

The material is there for you to build a bridge, build a ladder and climb up and reach for the stars.

You just have to realise it and believe in yourself. The moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease for ever to be able to do it.

― J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Have you heard of the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset? Fixed mindsets are limited, an example being, “I can’t do this,” whereas you could counter that with a growth mindset by telling yourself, “I can’t do this….yet.” The difference is in the belief that the inability is not permanent. It can be changed and you are in control.

When we praise a child for being smart we are working with a fixed mindset.

We do not succeed because we are good at something, we succeed because we have worked hard to be good at something. The belief that we can and will succeed encourages us to put in the work to eventually get where we want to be. Not because we are good at it but because we have worked hard to become good at it.

Our thoughts control us. We are what we believe we are. If we believe we are kind we will be kind, if we believe we are strong we will be strong. If we believe we can win we will win….eventually.

We need to dig deep to find that inner strength. There are so many layers that we can peel away to access what is buried within ourselves, within our soul, close to where our true selves lie. That is where our true intentions, our true beliefs, our true personality can be found.

There is no fooling that true self. There is no denial and no way to lie to our true selves. That aspect of ourselves will see right through the bullshit because it is sitting there at the back of it all watching.

We can dig deep physically to find that belief in ourselves, but we can also dig deep into thoughts and mind by sitting with ourselves and exploring the silence, looking inward and really seeing where we are at and what we are capable of.

We can achieve what we want to achieve.

We can look deep inside, like searching in a black well of nothingness to find a treasure deep within us which will guide us. That is the true self, it is belief and knowledge in our capabilities.

We want to work, we love to work. We want to sweat and fight and work through the back-breaking, painstaking labour to get to our destination, but why do we do that work? We do it because we believe. We know we can get there.

Peace,

George

 

 

 

Reference:

Useful videos:

The Power of belief — mindset and success | Eduardo Briceno | TEDxManhattanBeach

Related blogs:

Photo Credits:

Photo by Ran Berkovich on Unsplash

Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash